Rough Jump Faces

There is nothing better than a freshly groomed track in the morning that is perfectly tilled.  The track might as well be an interstate which can make anyone feel like a pro.  However, once things get rough, you have pick and choose lines as well as deal with the challenging jump faces.  Those who ride in softer soils know that by mid day, getting airborne can be a tricky ordeal.  Kickers, uneven angles and countless other variables can turn a simple table top into a treacherous obstacle.

To begin with, correct body positioning is essential.  Normally, keeping a neutral position over the seat will give you room to adjust.  The attack position is a sure way to get over an obstacle cleanly and jump faces are no different.  You should be squeezing the bike with your legs to begin with, but you need to put more emphasis on this as the track becomes rougher and rougher.  This will give you more control over the side to side movement of the rear tire.

Another piece of the puzzle is power.  When the track is smooth, you can get away with small mistakes.  However, when that same jump face gets chewed up, applying a steady dose throttle is vital.  When there is no forward drive, all of the weight wants to throw everything forward (especially four strokes).  To ensure you are getting the proper momentum, the right gear helps tremendously.  Trying to rev the bike out will create a bouncing effect in the suspension, which could amplify any mistakes you make. When you put the power to the ground effectively and tract through everything, you prevent the rear wheel from any kind of hopping.

One of the most overlooked aspects is just trusting your ability and remembering that the fundamentals are the best ways to get through anything.  As with most rough tracks, hitting the sides or any line other than the main helps keep you away from the holes, bumps and kickers.  Keeping a consistent amount of throttle will reduce will spin and maintain a straight drive up the face.  Confidence combined with fundamentals will have you ready for any situation.

 


Posted on Jun 24 2011, under Riding Techniques | 2 Comments »


2 Responses to “Rough Jump Faces”

  1. I’m laid up with a broken ankle because I missed three of these fundamentals, not weigthing the center of the bike, too much throttle late on the jump, not squzzing the bike with my leg. Fundamentals, fundamentals, fundamentals!

  2. tough lesson to learn! hope you get better soon

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